The Maysles’ JockDocs Brings You: Surfsup, 3 Days of Surf Madness (Feb 1-3)

Sponsored by Vitacoco

Friday Feb 1st
SURFWISE (Doug Pray, 2007) 93 minutes

Legendary surfer, Dorican “Doc” Paskowitz, abandoned a successful medical practice to withdraw from the lifestyle of mainstream America. But unlike other American searchers like Thoreau or Kerouac, Paskowitz took his wife and nine children along for the ride, all eleven of them living in a 24-foot camper. The family spent their days living by Doc’s rules on health, fitness, sexuality, and above all surfing.

Saturday Feb 2nd

SURFshorts @7:30pm
Special guests photographer +filmmaker Patrick Trefz and artist Jim Denevan

Art Exhibit* of photos by Patrick Trefz, and works by Jim Denevan

Conversation with filmmakers moderated by Tyler Breuer.
Benefit After-Party for Waves for Water Sandy Relief with Dj’s Matchie and John Dubstar

ODE TO CALIFORNIA (Patrick Trefz, 2010) 9 minutes

Anyone who has ever been in the sea understands that the ocean is a vast wilderness, and the northern California ocean reality is not always what it seems. “Ode to California” evades expectations in its depths of all things spoken and simultaneously unspoken. Timeless and provocative, “Ode” is a glimpse into the heart of the ocean and those that live in accordance with it.

ITXASOA ETA LEHORRA (Patrick Trefz, 2012) 8 minutes

An elegant film of artist Jim Denevan drawing in the sand of Mundaka in northern Spain, September 2011. The powerful soundtrack, “Low Tide” by Basque folk musician Mikel Laboa accompanies the equally mesmerizing coming and going of the drawing as it is enveloped by the tide.

NYC-centric SURFshorts:

HURRICANE SANDY (Etan Blatt, 2012) 4 minutes

Take a ride over New York 2 weeks after hurricane Sandy struck the coastline.

ROCKAWAY OPERA (Zac Halberd, 2012) 4minutes

Surfing at Rockaway Beach with opera.

SUNWAVES and FLOWING FREE (Joe Alberts, 1978, 1982) 40 minutes.

Never before screened seminal 70s and early 80’s footage of Montauk and more.

A TRAIN (Andrew Kidman, 2009) 4 minutes

THE GETAWAY (Joey Gallagher, 2010) 13:57

MOMENTA (Joni Sternbach, 2010) 7 minutes

THE SURF MAGAZINES DON’T TALK ABOUT LAPSED CATHOLICS (Toddy Stewart, 2012) 5 minutes

STACKED (Patrick Cummings and E.J. McLeavey-Fisher, 2011) 15 minutes

Portrait of local surf star Balaram Stack at the 2011 Quiksilver Pro New York.

Sunday Feb 3 @4pm

Morning of the Earth, 79 minutes, 1971, Albie Falzon, David Elfick

Classic, rarely-seen first film from Albie Falzon, creator of renowned Australian surfing magazine TRACKS, and David Elfick come this early fantasy of surfers living in three unspoiled lands and playing in nature’s ocean. The most ambitious surf film of its time—the directors show surfers making their own boards (and homes) as they travel in search of the perfect wave across Australia’s north-east coast, Bali and Hawaii. The soundtrack became the first Australian Gold soundtrack album.

 
Patrick Trefz and Jim Denevan Exhibit@ Maysles Cinema

Throughout the week there will be an informal exhibition highlighting works of artist Jim Denevan and filmmaker/photographer Patrick Trefz. A selection of photographs, presented in postcard-like format, will span decades of documenting Denevan’s days and drawings on the landscape. Edited film stills from Trefz’s Ode to California convey the essence of an ineffable non-narrative. Like his films, they evoke a timeless and provocative glimpse into the heart of the ocean and those that live in accordance with it. With a longstanding friendship, an intimate dialog surfaces in the pairing of their work.

For tickets and additional information:

http://www.mayslesinstitute.org/cinema/jockdocs.html

Surfsup –A Jockdocs: Surfing Program curated by Laura Coxson.

Special thanks to Patrick Trefz, Jim Denevan, Michael Machemer, Kerri Rosenstein, Tyler Breuer, Rebekah Maysles, Sean Nam, wavesforwater, Sarah Rigano, Julie Gilhart and Jessica Green. Vitacoco Coconut Water.

Associate professor Alonzo Crawford, who has taught cinematography since 1974, agrees that, if Howard has a secret to minting talented cinematographers, it’s in the mix of theory and pragmatism that go hand in hand with one of the country’s premier African American educational institutions. “I impress upon the young people that there’s more to it than just pointing the camera,” he says. “It’s very interesting that the fundamental building block of the motion picture is termed ‘shot.’ Therefore, the camera must be a weapon. And the shot has to be at the enemy or the [source] of your oppression, or else you blow your own brains out with it.” Crawford teaches the basics, too: He puts his students through overnight “boot camps,” where they’re urged to “shoot and shoot and shoot.” He immerses them in Caravaggio and Rembrandt in order to study the painterly use of light. Dickerson, Jafa and Young — each of whom Crawford taught — internalized those values in their own manner, he says. “They all relate that to their social and political consciousness. So when it comes to lighting someone a certain way, there is Hollywood and then there is Brad, who’s doing it a different way.” “I think being men of color, the way they want to photograph people of color is a big objective for them,” he says. “They all come from Howard [and] they’ve seen the way people of color have been photographed since the inception of cinema, that the way we’re represented is not truly justified, and I think that drives them a lot.”

Ann Hornaday, “Howard University Has Become Incubator For Cinematographers,” washingtonpost.com 1/28/13

And cinematographers—along with directors, writers, and producers—work with film editors to create the documentaries we know and love (or dislike). Maysles Institute is offering a beginner’s course of film editing! Check it out:

**DATES**
Monday February 11, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Monday February 18, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Monday February 25, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm

This is a comprehensive introduction workshop for those interested in learning non-linear editing with Final Cut Pro 7.  You will learn basic system setup and interface for FCP7, basic 3-point editing, video transitions, advance editing tools including trimming and roll edits, media management, ingesting both tape-less and tape based media, logging, creating titles and importing graphics and other media.  This introduction to Final Cut Pro gives a solid foundation to those new to editing and non-linear editing software, and provides hands-on experience enabling you to feel comfortable to edit on it.

No equipment or prior experience necessary.  

For more information, please contact education@mayslesinstitute.org or 212.537.6843 ext. 2.

[Steve] Barclay: I’ve had some [directors] who would just leave me to it. I’ve worked with others who want to sit on my lap. Both scenarios are fine. As an editor we’re the guardian of the film. If a director needs to get away for whatever reason, it’s our responsibility to send them home. It’s not going to do them any good having them stick around.

[Sam] Santana: As an editor, you have to instinctively know that if the director’s hands on, then you have to let them be hands on. Instinctively the more you do it, the more you’ll now.

—Nigel Smith, interviewing documentary film editors Steve Barclay and Sam Santana, on how to be a better film editor.

Maysles Institute’s film editing class starts Monday, February 11th! Check it out:

Final Cut Pro for Beginners

**DATES**
Monday February 11, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Monday February 18, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
Monday February 25, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm

This is a comprehensive introduction workshop for those interested in learning non-linear editing with Final Cut Pro 7.  You will learn basic system setup and interface for FCP7, basic 3-point editing, video transitions, advance editing tools including trimming and roll edits, media management, ingesting both tape-less and tape based media, logging, creating titles and importing graphics and other media.  This introduction to Final Cut Pro gives a solid foundation to those new to editing and non-linear editing software, and provides hands-on experience enabling you to feel comfortable to edit on it.

No equipment or prior experience necessary.

For more information, please email education@mayslesinstitute.org or call 212.537.6843 ext. 2.

Editing is a fine art and important in telling the story. A good editor can salvage the shaky footage you tell people was shaky on purpose for the sake of art.

LOL! At Maysles Institute, we’ll teach you the beginnings of this fine art, whether or not you receive shaky footage. Check it out:

Final Cut Pro for Beginners
Dates:
- Monday February 11, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
- Monday February 18, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm
- Monday February 25, 2013, 6:30pm-9:30pm

Location: 
The Maysles Institute, 343 Lenox Avenue, between 127th & 128th Streets in Harlem 

Cost: 
$225

This is a comprehensive introduction workshop for those interested in learning non-linear editing with Final Cut Pro 7. You will learn basic system setup and interface for FCP7, basic 3-point editing, video transitions, advance editing tools including trimming and roll edits, media management, ingesting both tape-less and tape based media, logging, creating titles and importing graphics and other media. This introduction to Final Cut Pro gives a solid foundation to those new to editing and non-linear editing software, and provides hands-on experience enabling you to feel comfortable to edit on it. 

No equipment or prior experience necessary.

In anticipation of the upcoming debut of Triggering Wounds from Maysles Institute’s Teen Producers Academy, we’re featuring previous work from the program’s students, starting with Weave Me Alone, directed and produced by Nia Ferguson and Yasmin Williams. Their doc is also a Big Muddy Film Festival nominee.

Check out more videos from the Teen Producers Academy!

Teen Producers Academy Docs Accepted Into Big Muddy Film Festival!

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We at Maysles Institute just heard that the following documentaries from the Teen Producers Academy have been accepted into the Big Muddy Film Festival (in alphabetical order): 

Daniel (directed and produced by L’Eunice Faust and Roxanne Mauras)

Fast Food or Fast Poison (directed and produced by Ilaini Maximo and Kahni Wilks)

Icee Man (directed and produced by Guiomar Camano and Claudia Almazo)

Sagomatic (directed and produced by Alejandro Rosario)

Universal Playlist (directed and produced by Brandon Charlton, Senetchut Floyd, and Tylar Johnson)

Weave Me Alone (directed and produced by Nia Ferguson and Yasmin Williams)

Congrats to the directors, producers, and everyone supporting them!

New York Times Review, 1970: _King: A Filmed Record From Montgomery To Memphis

Although it makes some attempt to distinguish Dr. King and his nonviolence from the black militants who came after him, and although the distinction is accurate, the film strongly suggests the continuity of Dr. King and his successors in a drive toward a viable group identity. Dr. King’s strategies, seen here in rich and spacious detail, seem to have been designed less for winning civil rights as such than for the use of civil rights as a means to human dignity. In Dr. King’s platform and pulpit manner (of which there is agood deal) that bid follows a traditional Christian rhetoric for which religious belief and self-dramatization go hand in hand. The manner seems flamboyant, and a little old-fashioned. But it was a real form of communication, and for a while it worked.

When it begins not to work, after the fire hoses of Birmingham have been replaced by the lawn sprinklers of Chicago, it strains toward a sense of fulfillment (with many quotations from “The Battle Hymn of the Republic”) that really does seem hollow. The film catches this shift with great precision and insight, just as it faithfully records only only bitter victories (for example, the Birmingham jail) but also victorious-seeming defeats (for example, the descent of the celebrities for the end of the third Selma march: a Nichols and May comedy routine, Harry Belafonte singing about the girl in Kingston Town.)

But the truth of “King” is ultimately a ceremonial truth, of symbolic gestures, crowds, surging response. I know nothing to compare it with except Leni Riefenstahl’s magnificent “Triumph of the Will”—not, of course, in tone or content, but rather in its comprehension of history as drama. But “Triumph of the Will” was history staged for the camera, and “King” is history understood by the camera. “King” attempts no analysis. It raises reportage to the power of ritual, and for all its lapses it is a most solemnly beautiful film.

Maysles Cinema, in collaboration with Documentary Forum at City College, kicks off a series of nationwide screenings of this historic film tracing Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s  life and work.

And we’re thrilled to have legendary performer Harry Belafonte appear live in a post-screening panel discussion to talk about his time with Dr. King!

The Maysles Cinema/Documentary Forum screening and panel discussion, moderated by DJ Spooky, will be held at the Church of the Intercession, at 550 W. 155th Street and Broadway, at 4PM. Get your tickets for the event here!

Yes, this trailer is for a movie, co-directed by Sidney Lumet and Joseph L. Mankiewicz, that appeared as a one-time-only event in 1970! 

Maysles Cinema and the Documentary Forum at City College of New York kicks off a series of nationwide screening of King: A Filmed Record From Montgomery to Memphisto celebrate the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and King’s legendary “I Have a Dream” speech…and we’re kicking it off with legendary performer/activist Harry Belafonte! 

Join us—along with DJ Spooky, who will moderate the panel with Mr. Belafonte and other guests TBA—on Sunday, February 17, at The Church of the Intercession, located at 550 W. 155th St. and Broadway. The movie starts at 4PM, followed by the panel at 7:15PM. For more info and tickets, check here!

Then, the fateful call came from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Dr. King called Belafonte to chat. Four hours later, Belafonte said, “I knew I would always be in his service, and I knew the length of that journey.” With that relationship came his involvement with the John F. and Robert Kennedy in helping move the Civil Rights struggles further into the national consciousness by helping make it a presidential matter. How Belafonte helped with this is appealing to Robert. After seeing how he appealed to state official to get Dr. King out of serving on a chain gang over a traffic violation, Belafonte said of Robert, “”If there was going to be a moral conscience [within the Kennedy family], it would be Bobby.” And Robert worked with John to gain support from Black communities.

Join Racialicious Crush alum Harry Belafonte for a post-screening discussion about King: A Filmed Record From Montgomery To Memphis this Sunday, February 17, at The Church of the Intercession, located at 550 W. 155th St. and Broadway. 

The movie, which chronicles the life and work of Dr. Martin Luther King and how people like Belafonte crossed paths with the Civil Rights leader, starts at 4PM. The panel discussion, with Mr. Belafonte and other guest (TBA) and moderated by DJ Spooky, starts at 7:15PM. Tickets are going fast, so please buy your ticket here!

We’re getting geeked about the Teens Producers Academy’s latest documentary, Triggering Wounds, which is coming soon! In celebration of the debut, we’re showing other student films.

Ilaini Maximo and Kahni Wilks helmed this Big Muddy Film Festival acceptee, called Fast Food Or Fast Poison, that tells one person’s struggle with diabetes as tied to the larger issue of food deserts in Harlem.

Want to see other student films? Click here!